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  1. Philae to land on comet 67P on 12 November

    Publishing date:

    September 26, 2014

    The European Space Agency (ESA) has announced that its Rosetta spacecraft will deploy the Philae lander on 12 November. The chosen landing site will be finally confirmed on 14 October.

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  2. Philae landing site named Agilkia

    Publishing date:

    November 4, 2014

    Thousands of you responded to ESA's call to find a name for Philae's landing site, initially designated ‘Site J'. It has now been named Agilkia. This name was among the proposals from France shortlisted for the competition by CNES... and it was submitted by a Frenchman!

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  3. Rosetta reaches its destination

    Publishing date:

    August 6, 2014

    After flawlessly completing a 10th rendezvous braking manoeuvre since 7 May, Rosetta arrived today at its destination and is now 100 km from the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

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  4. Philae landing site selected

    Publishing date:

    September 15, 2014

    After a busy weekend at CNES in Toulouse, Rosetta mission managers have chosen Philae’s landing site: on 11 November, if all goes according to plan, Europe’s lander module will touch down at Site J, located on the ‘head’ of comet 67P.

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  5. Rosetta: Five landing sites selected for Philae

    Publishing date:

    August 25, 2014

    Two and a half months before the long-awaited touchdown of Philae, scores of scientists from ESA, CNES, DLR and other agencies and laboratories convened at CNES in Toulouse this weekend, to draw up a list of five suitable landing sites on the nucleus of comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P). Touchdown is still on-schedule for mid-November.

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  6. OSIRIS 11-cm-resolution pictures reveal comet in unprecedented detail

    Publishing date:

    March 3, 2015

    During its St Valentine’s Day flyby passing just 6 km from comet 67P’s nucleus, Rosetta’s OSIRIS-NAC narrow angle camera obtained an image with a pixel resolution of 11 cm showing the orbiter’s own shadow cast on the surface.

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